Q&A with Southern Soul singer Lady Adrena, a skilled and talented Blues aficionado, her writing creativity comes from life experiences

"I miss most the authenticity. The rawness. We try to perfect every little thing in today's music. The subtle mistakes made in yesterday's music were what I call "good mistakes" that the listener most likely doesn't even recognize lol. My fear is that music will become so synthesized that it'll be robotic. That's why I love the blues because it still has it's rawness and authenticity. The live instruments just bring a different feel and future hopes are for the blues music to really really become mainstream."

Lady Adrena: Recipe For The Blues

Vocalist and Songwriter, Adrienne Palmer aka "LADY ADRENA" was born May 24, 1980 in Jackson Mississippi. Her singing career began at age five in County Line Baptist Church and has continued to flourish. Adrena's music is being aired on stations in the United States, France and the United Kingdom. ADRENA’s love for music has always been astounding. Thus, much of her writing creativity comes from life experiences. With all the right concoctions that sculpt a riveting composition, Lady Adrena’s fascinating EP, ‘Recipe for the Blues’ (2023) is arguably the genre’s best offering. The striking new EP was released for listeners in late October but owing to its infectious appeal and roaring success is still receiving an increasing number of streams and listeners.

(Photo: Vocalist and Songwriter, Adrienne Palmer aka Lady Adrena)

A skilled and talented Blues aficionado, Adrena started singing at the age of 5 in a southern Baptist church is a small town in Jackson, MS. Within the walls of that quaint setting, Lady Adrena discovered a passion and burning love for the art of the Blues. After being in church and school choirs and being a percussionist in bands, she cultivated her talent. Her stunning EP is a depiction of all the learning, techniques and style learned over the years which she has acquired. Lady Adrena began her musical career by originally writing and singing Southern Soul music. Although she enjoyed southern soul and she did well, her previous style failed to capture the pure essence of who she was. However, with the opportunity to meet numerous influential people, Lady Adrena continually perfected her stage presence and learned to connect with the audience.

Interview by Michael Limnios

How has the Blues and Gospel music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

Blues and Gospel kind of go hand in hand. They both tell stories of happy times, sad times, injustices and hope for better. On my musical journey I've learned that music is a universal language. One may not comprehend the language, but the heart and soul understands the music through emotions.

How do you describe your sound and songbook? What's the balance in music between technique and soul?

I would describe my sound as versatile. I can be rough and rigid, but I can also be soft and sultry. Being in choral music I was taught lots of techniques to singing but when I merged technique and embarrassing my sound I started to sing from the depths of my soul.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

I've learned that everyone won't like your music, but most can relate to the lyrics and that there's always more to learn so just enjoy the journey and do it because you love it.

"Blues and Gospel kind of go hand in hand. They both tell stories of happy times, sad times, injustices and hope for better. On my musical journey I've learned that music is a universal language. One may not comprehend the language, but the heart and soul understands the music through emotions." (Photo: Lady Adrena began her musical career by originally writing and singing Southern Soul music.)

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

Working with Dexter Allen in the studio, has been a learning experience. He taught me to reach deep down and sing from my gut. I was scared the first recording "Receipe for the Blues " because I didn't like the way I sounded. He took my hand looked me dead in the eyes and said, "You have something spectacular and the most beautiful thing about is, nobody can do it like you". That has stuck with me on and off stage.  My most memorable moment was placing 2nd in Vicksburg IBC Challenge.  Although I didn't win 1st place, that was the day I realized, yeah, the blues chose me.

What do you miss most nowadays from the music of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

I miss most the authenticity. The rawness. We try to perfect every little thing in today's music. The subtle mistakes made in yesterday's music were what I call "good mistakes" that the listener most likely doesn't even recognize lol. My fear is that music will become so synthesized that it'll be robotic. That's why I love the blues because it still has it's rawness and authenticity. The live instruments just bring a different feel and future hopes are for the blues music to really really become mainstream.

What is the impact of the Blues/Soul music on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want the music to affect people?

It has brought and is still bringing all social classes together. All ethnicities and ages. It's relatable to all-in-one way or another. As adults we can understand the lyrics and the music, and the young blues lovers understand the music and feeling it brings. I was once that young blues lover. I want music to be a survival/escape mechanism that helps forget about your problems, help solve a problem, bring comfort in knowing you're not alone in any situation. Just giving a good message along with great music.

What does to be a female artist in a Man’s World as James Brown says? What is the status of women in music?

Hey it is what it is. It's a man's world but women, we are making our mark and we definitely hold our own. Music has no gender, but the music business does.

"I've learned that everyone won't like your music, but most can relate to the lyrics and that there's always more to learn so just enjoy the journey and do it because you love it. (Photo: Lady Adrena)

Do you think there is an audience for blues music in its current state? or at least a potential for young people to become future audiences and fans?

Of course there's audience for blues music as it is right now, and I see it growing. The artists are starting youngers and the listening audience is getting younger. When I look at the attendance of the festivals and shows, rather inside or outside people are really showing up really supporting blues music. People come from all over the world in great numbers to see their favorite artists perform and some are family events which breed young blues lovers and as long as the blues is alive that tradition will go on generation to generation.

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