Q&A with Terry Medd of The Bluesland Horn Band, talented musicians dedicated to keeping blues music alive and well.

"I do miss the tremendous originality that blossomed in the late 60’s and 70’s. Digitization wreaked havoc on the industry and although it’s come back, I’m not sure it’s come back better. We don’t follow fads too closely preferring to continue on our own musical path."

Terry Medd: Welcome in the Bluesland

Western Canada’s The Bluesland Horn Band is an eight-piece group in the classic tradition whose members have graced the stages of festivals and shows throughout North America. The band’s repertoire of originals and covers ranges through styles such as classic Memphis-style R&B, blues, and second line New Orleans grooves with a touch of gospel and country swing. Blues fans may remember the band who toured through Western Canada from 1998 to 2004, releasing one album called 1st Street. The band was reformed in 2013 and released an album called Down In New Orleans which landed in the top 10 most-played blues album on Canadian radio for 2014. The album Radio Waves was released in 2016 and went to number one on the Canadian Blues Radio Network. 

(Photo: Bluesland Horn Band)

The band was reformed by producer/guitarist Terry Medd and has top albums to their name. On June 16th, The Bluesland Horn Band will be releasing their sixth album, aptly titled SIX. Featuring ten original and refreshing compositions, SIX is a soulful and bluesy listening experience from start to finish. Starting with "My Old Truck", a swampy, sexy Louisiana-style love song, followed by "Creole Queen" a funky horn piece in celebration of New Orleans and their famous steam-boats. "Shuffle In the Attic" is a straight-up blues shuffle instrumental, while "Rock My Roll" is reminiscent of a steamy Rolling Stones vibe. "Keep the Devil Behind" presents an atmospheric blues chiller at the crossroads. The instrumental "Alley Shuffle" is an energetic straight-up blues shuffle, leading to a heartfelt blues ballad emanating from covid-based introspection called "Holy Water". Moving on to track eight, the up-tempo shuffle "Not Ready" is all about staying young with music. "Solitaire" is a gorgeous orchestral piece, inspired by the beauty of the hummingbird. The album closes with a story about a rebel leaving old ways behind called "So Long, Goodbye".

Interview by Michael Limnios                    Special Thanks: Sarah French Publicity

How has the Blues annd Soul music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

Blues and blues-based music is the lens through which I view most music. Can I hear the blues in it? Can I detect that this music was created by a soulful person?

How do you describe band’s sound and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from?

The band was called Bluesland Horn Band so that we could explore all blues-based genres of music. At a performance we split originals and covers roughly 50/50.

Why do you think that the horn rhythm section continues to generate such a devoted following?

Keeping an eight piece group together is not easy and these types of bands are few and far between so people who fall in the blues/jazz bag are going to know they can find those elements in our performances and albums.

(Lessons learned include; staying on your musical path, keep the band together, work on your craft every day, think long term, maintain relationships at all levels, stay humble and appreciate and respect the music fans." (Photo: Bluesland Horn Band)

What moment changed your music life the most? What´s been the highlights in your life and career so far?

For a musician/writer/producer, when you hear your music being played on the radio or other bands playing your songs, it validates the art that you are putting out and your particular musical journey.

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

We have fond memories of club gigs and concerts especially where people are dancing and interacting with your own songs.

What do you miss most nowadays from the music of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

I do miss the tremendous originality that blossomed in the late 60’s and 70’s. Digitization wreaked havoc on the industry and although it’s come back, I’m not sure it’s come back better. We don’t follow fads too closely preferring to continue on our own musical path.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

Lessons learned include; staying on your musical path, keep the band together, work on your craft every day, think long term, maintain relationships at all levels, stay humble and appreciate and respect the music fans.

Do you think there is an audience for Blues/Soul music in its current state? or at least a potential for young people to become future audiences and fans?

Yes certainly, it’s all about the young person who sees his or her first show and sees what is possible and possibly pursues that. For older fans of the genre it’s just about connecting with them for live shows and new records as they are already into the music.

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(Photo: Bluesland Horn Band)

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