Q&A with Tampa-based Alex Lopez, an acclaimed musical artist quickly taking the blues/rock scene by storm

"I think blues brings people of all backgrounds together as everyone can relate and honestly, I believe that it's a very open accepting genre. I've seen where other traditionally rooted African-American music has remained in the black community where as in blues it's become a wonderful blend of all people."

Alex Lopez: Alter Blues/Rock Mixology

Alex Lopez is an acclaimed songwriter/guitarist and musical artist quickly taking the blues/rock scene by storm. Alex was born in the heartland of rock ‘n’ roll Cleveland Ohio and started playing keyboards before becoming inspired by British blues/rock bands to master the guitar. Influenced by greats like Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page and Jimi Hendrix, Alex spent his young adulthood performing in clubs and recording/producing his original songs in studios while polishing his songwriting skills. After his move to Florida to attend college and then taking some time to raise a family, Alex spent years as the vocalist and lead guitarist of the wildly popular rock band Reminiscion before striking out on his own.

In September of 2013 Alex released the album “Back Bedroom Blues” a collection of all original blues and blues/rock songs displaying his formidable skills as a blues guitarist and singer/songwriter. And in 2015 Alex Lopez released his second CD “Is It A Lie” to excellent reviews. With his third album “Slowdown”, Alex achieved a new level of success, international recognition and critical acclaim. The album appeared on blues, jam and Americana charts received worldwide airplay and earned Alex fans across the globe. Alex continues to perform throughout Florida with his talented band, The Xpress, and at concerts and festivals throughout the Southeast and is preparing to tour the US. With the release of his new fourth album “Yours Truly, Me” (2019), Alex is sure to continue his ascent in the blues rock world. Backed by his touring band, The Xpress, featuring Kenny Hoye on keyboards, Steve Roberts on bass and drummer David Nunez, Lopez moves easily from British blues to soul and jazzy pop, on eleven original tracks and an inspired cover of a Texas blues rock classic.

Interview by Michael Limnios

How has the Blues and Rock counterculture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

As a musician the Blues rock counterculture to a degree is about suffering for your art and struggling grinding it out playing in an intimate club style setting, it's an almost anti-success mindset. It puts you in environments where at times you are up and close with the fans and that's made me connect with people in unique way, getting to really know their stories. It's also driven career decisions, as it forces you to select which direction you take at the crossroads - stay with clubs (gritty close and personal) or go for a larger platform to deliver your music.

How do you describe your songbook and sound? Where does your creative drive come from?

I call it Alternative Blues/rock mixology: contemporary blues that blends melody and groove with elements of rock, pop, and jazz to expand the boundaries of the genre. My sound is a mixture of the diversity of influences i had musically growing up. As for songwriting, its honestly something I've done as long as i can remember and for me its not creative drive, writing songs is like breathing. I can't live without it and I don't think about it as I've just been able to do it. That said, emotions good and bad typically are a catalyst for my songwriting.

"As a musician the Blues rock counterculture to a degree is about suffering for your art and struggling grinding it out playing in an intimate club style setting, it's an almost anti-success mindset."

Which acquaintances have been the most important experiences? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

I have an expression I live by which is "all I want are friends" so the list of people I have met that have ended up having an impact in my life is pretty long. Sometimes the most casual of acquaintances can be life changing and in music that has been very true. One of the best agents I've worked with was someone I bumped into at a festival. Best advice personally and musically has been "be yourself" which is so true. Being the best, you are better than trying to be something you are not...

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

There's the time I had a gig in Florida to a packed house (small venue maybe 75 people?) and the power went because of a lightning storm. so, we improvised I pulled out the acoustic and we did sing-alongs until the power came back. You never know what can happen at a gig.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

Blues was the dangerous music of it's time, provocative and sultry. Today it seems like people relate it to "old-timers" music. So, I kind of wish that edge was still associated with the blues. My hope for the blues is to keep making it accessible and continue re-inventing so it can remain a meaningful genre, as the expression goes - keep the blues alive.

If you could change one thing in the musical world and it would become a reality, what would that be?

At the risk of sounding like a capitalist, I guess it would be to change how streaming has negatively impacted the ability of great bands and songwriters to make a living without having to stay on the road constantly. It's always been a tough business but no more than ever it is truly hard to make the economics always work.

"Blues was the dangerous music of it's time, provocative and sultry. Today it seems like people relate it to "old-timers" music. So, I kind of wish that edge was still associated with the blues."

What touched (emotionally) you from the local blues scene? What characterize the sound of Florida?

The loyalty of the fans locally is amazing. There is no better feeling than looking into an audience and seeing the friendly face of a regular fan. Really, that can be emotionally uplifting and creates huge gratitude for their loyalty.

Florida is a melting pot and for sure it has a swampy groove feel that it brings to the blues. The successful Florida bands I see have bring a unique flavor to the blues and experiment with the formula. I also think it's a happier blues. We live in paradise here and unless you have memories of up north (I'm originally from Cleveland) sometimes, in my opinion, Florida blues isn't as gritty as other places.

What is the impact of Blues music and culture to the racial, political, and socio-cultural implications?

It's roots are in black music 100% and so there are no racial divides in blues. NONE! I love that about music in general but specifically in blues. I think blues brings people of all backgrounds together as everyone can relate and honestly, I believe that it's a very open accepting genre. I've seen where other traditionally rooted African-American music has remained in the black community where as in blues it's become a wonderful blend of all people. As long as everyone never forgets to pay homage to those greats that started it for all of us, I think it breaks through the divides.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

Wow so interesting a question so tough to answer. The typical answer is I would have liked to have been a musician in the 60's but historically I would've liked to visit the greatness of Rome or even Athens during their golden age.

Alex Lopez - Home

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