Q&A with Greg Guy -the son of Buddy Guy- one of the hottest young guitar-slinging blues artists on set today

"Blues is old and sad same bs. Blues is life, music is life. Blues my dad listens to as a kid is still played on the radio no other genres is universally played over time & time again."

Greg Guy: Keeping the Blues Alive!

Greg Guy is a recipient of the 2014 Chicago Blues Hall of Fame as an Honorary Master of Blues, and his guitar playing is greatly influenced by Prince — aside from being the son of the Living Legend Buddy Guy. One of Chicago’s own Sons of the Blues, Greg Guy has been playing music most of his life, as it’s in his DNA. He started playing his guitar publicly on the Buddy Guy’s Legends stage in 2009 during his father’s January Residency shows. With prior attempts he built the courage to join his father. He has toured the world with his father in the following places: São Paulo, Brazil, Arizona, California, Colorado, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin.

Greg Guy / Photo © by Jake Warkel

In 2019, Greg played with Kenny “Beedy-Eyes” Smith at the Chicago Blues Fest and stacked up recording credits with chart-topping Irish traditional musician Sharon Shannon on “Sacred Earth”; Dave Weld and The Imperial Flames on “Slip Into A Dream”; Chris Wragg and Greg Copeland’s “Deep In The Blood”; and the critically acclaimed new release “Drop The Hammer,” by another of Chicago’s Sons of the Blues, the great Kenny “Beedy-Eyes” Smith. Greg ventured on his own building musical relationships overseas in Rome and London, taking his guitar playing to new heights. Greg Guy and The Robert Fetzer Band can be found at Chicago local blues venues collaborating together in the tradition of “Keeping the Blues Alive.” Greg Guy is proving to audiences everywhere he’s one of the hottest young guitar-slinging blues artists on set today, and rightful heir to the greatest name in blues music.

Interview by Michael Limnios                             Special Thanks: Vicky Guy

How has the Blues and Soul/Funk music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

Well, I put it this way… If there was a way to inject music into people, there would be a cure for cancer.

Music kept me focus & out of trouble. It consumed my life especially listening to Prince.

How do you describe your sound and music philosophy? Where does your creative drive come from?

I describe my music as soulisticaly blues funk with a twist of hip. It’s just me. I would say my creative drive comes from and is a gift from God it just happens naturally; open mind, open heart.

What moment changed your life the most? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

Every moment is life changing a moment, a moment I might have thought changed me will change from today to tomorrow because no one is promised tomorrow.

The best advice someone has giving me was ...for me to keep doing what I’m doing & to stay in that circle; remaining focus.

"Know more about it, be aware of your surroundings, don’t take anyone for granted, keep moving forward, stay positive, and play more blues…" (Greg Guy & Buddy Guy / Photo © by Constantin Ciocan)

Are there any specific memories or highlights of your career that you would like to tell us about?!

Sure! Greeting on the stage playing with my dad the very first time. I can say I miss the musicians I’ve never met or met yet.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

Well, I don’t miss the music the music at all. It’s still around it can still be heard & I love being a part of keeping the blues alive. It’s my culture & my legacy. That it’s not getting enough air play & media coverage specially in the US. Now that’s the blues!  Other countries love blues musicians more than our own.

Fear is real blues musicians will be forgotten by those duplicating the same style & set; specially with social media. These kids don’t know the true history or who the originally blues musician songs because someone on YouTube or social media got more views.

What would you say characterizes Chicago blues scene in comparison to other local US scenes and circuits?

The artist and the surrounding life; living life in the city and serious about paying dues. Chicago has a strong community & local businesses support each other specially seen through Covid.

What is the impact of Blues on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want the music to affect people?

Blues is old and sad same bs. Blues is life, music is life. Blues my dad listens to as a kid is still played on the radio no other genres is universally played over time & time again. Keep them happy & dancing…. now smile. Like my dad says blues chases the blues away.

"Well, I don’t miss the music the music at all. It’s still around it can still be heard & I love being a part of keeping the blues alive. It’s my culture & my legacy. That it’s not getting enough air play & media coverage specially in the US. Now that’s the blues!  Other countries love blues musicians more than our own.

Fear is real blues musicians will be forgotten by those duplicating the same style & set; specially with social media. These kids don’t know the true history or who the originally blues musician songs because someone on YouTube or social media got more views."

(Greg Guy / Photo © by Vicky Guy)

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

Know more about it, be aware of your surroundings, don’t take anyone for granted, keep moving forward, stay positive, and play more blues….

Greg Guy Music - Home

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